WWI Memorial. 1914-1919

Why 1919?

WW1 War Memorial Panel
Ronnie Pigram
WW1 War Memorial Panel
Ronnie Pigram
WW1 Memorial Panel
Ronnie Pigram
(British War Medal 1914-1918 Left) (Victory Medal 1914-1919 Right)
Ronnie Pigram
British War Medal 1914-1918
Ronnie Pigram
Victory Medal 1914-1919
Ronnie Pigram

Armistice Day on 11 November commemorates the armistice signed between the Allies of World War 1 and Germany for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front which took effect at 11:00 a.m., “the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918.  While this official date to mark the end of the war reflects the cease fire on the Western Front, hostilities continued in other regions, especially across the former Russian Empire and in parts of the old Ottoman Empire.  It took a further six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to finalise when on 28 June 1919 the Treaty of Versailles was signed and ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, a main contribution to the outbreak of the First World War.

The war years engraved on memorials is a matter for local authorities to decide, 1914-1918 or 1914-1919, matters not.  Remembering the fallen transcends all.

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  • Our war memorial at the old St Clements Church in West Thurrock is dated 1914-1919.

    By Gerry Hughes (22/10/2018)

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